Home > astronomy > NASA releases Cassini image of three Saturnian moons

NASA releases Cassini image of three Saturnian moons

As NASA’s Cassini probe continues its exploration of Saturn and its moons, it sends home some amazing images of that distant region of our solar system.

Yesterday, NASA released an image showing three of the gas giant’s moons: Tethys, Enceladus, and Mimas. Here it is:

Three moons, obtained Dec. 2015, released Feb. 22, 2016

Tethys (above the rings), Enceladus (just below center and below the rings), and Mimas (below and to the left of Enceladus) appear in this image obtained by Cassini in visible light on Dec. 3, 2015. Courtesy NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory – California Institute of Technology, Space Science Institute.

According to NASA:

The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 837,000 miles (1.35 million kilometers) from Enceladus, with an image scale of 5 miles (8 kilometers) per pixel. Tethys was approximately 1.2 million miles (1.9 million kilometers) away with an image scale of 7 miles (11 kilometers) per pixel. Mimas was approximately 1.1 million miles (1.7 million kilometers) away with an image scale of 6 miles (10 kilometers) per pixel.

Tethys’ diameter is about 1,066 kilometers. The cratered moon orbits Saturn from a distance of about 294,600 kilometers. That is about 20 percent farther from Saturn than the Moon is from Earth. Tethys is slightly less dense than liquid water, which suggests that its structure is mostly ice. This frigid moon is tidally locked to Saturn – it does not rotate and only one side of Tethys faces Saturn.

Enceladus is smaller than Tethys, with a diameter of about 500 kilometers. The host of a sub-surface liquid water ocean, Enceladus is covered by water ice and  reflects nearly all the sunlight that hits it. That makes it a very cold satellite. The surface temperature on the moon is about -201 degrees Celsius. It orbits Saturn from a mean distance of about 238,000 kilometers, which is about the same distance as Earth’s satellite is from our planet.

enceladus-small

This whimsical poster depicting Enceladus is part of NASA’s Visions of the Future project. You can see more at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/visions-of-the-future/. Courtesy NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory – California Institute of Technology.

Mimas is the smallest of Saturn’s major moons. It is heavily cratered, with a giant crater called Herschel stretching across about one-third of its surface. That feature has led Mimas to sometimes be called the “Death Star moon” because it evokes the fictional planet-destroying spacecraft in the Star Wars films. Mimas’ diameter is about 400 kilometers; it orbits Saturn from a mean distance of about 200,000 kilometers.

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