Home > Earth science > NASA photo shows collapse of iceberg

NASA photo shows collapse of iceberg

Check out this photo showing the collapse of an iceberg in the Southern Ocean earlier this month. The iceberg broke off from a larger ice floe about twelve years ago.

Called B-15J, the iceberg was a remnant of the much larger iceberg B-15, which broke off from Antarctica’s Ross ice sheet in 2000. Before breaking into smaller pieces B-15 was about 170 miles long and about 25 miles long.

Icebergs result from the calving of ice shelves, which are the edges of glaciers. When the ice shelves break up, a phenomenon that can happen with greater frequency as Earth’s atmosphere warms, the glacier itself is likely to begin to move faster.

When they do, more ice enters the oceans, which can cause increases in sea levels.

Icebergs melt as they move into warmer waters farther away from the poles.

Photo courtesy NASA. Hat tip to the folks at Our Amazing Planet for the heads up!

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

coastal traveler

Trust, Faith and Change

Lewis Editorial

Bringing stories to life

THE WILD LIFE

Animals and Nature Photography with Travel Tips for World Nomads

The 70 at 70 Challenge

And so, I turned 70, and a new decade beckons....

The Last Ocean

Protecting the Ross Sea, Antarctica.

eoearthlive

Encyclopedia of Earth on WordPress

Evolutionary Biology

No foresight, no way back

Why? Because Science.

Combating Stupidity Since 2012

Empirical SCOTUS

Viewing the Supreme Court in an entirely new light

Discover

A daily selection of the best content published on WordPress, collected for you by humans who love to read.

%d bloggers like this: